How to Reduce Blinding and Pegging Issues in Vibratory Screens

For blinding issues on vibratory screens, look for a thick, mucous layer. It bridges the apertures and blocks them with dirt. Pegging issues are similar, except now there are tiny bits of material blocking the screen openings. But there will always be lumps of gunge in mining. It’s the same with solid material aperture blockages. On accepting this hard (and soft) truth, equipment designers take up the challenge.

Breaking Down the Blinding Challenge

Water has surface tension. If a few drops of water stretch across a small hole, they form a film. It’s the same with dirty fluids. If that mucky stuff lines the media of a vibratory screen, it’ll bridge the screen apertures and form a skin, of sorts. The first thing to do, then, is to discourage this action. Equipment engineers do this by using film-discouraging aperture shapes. Long slots and fine wiry inserts stop dirty fluid films from developing. One other option is to create screen media out of naturally slippery plastics. Polyurethanes work well as slippery blinding prevention materials.

Eliminating Frustrating Pegging Difficulties

Engineering-wise, this is a harder challenge to solve. Filmy skins can be punctured and dismissed. A change in aperture shape is usually enough to discourage the surface tension effect. For solids, well, a different approach is required. High-impact equipment oscillation strokes are one possible option, but such movements usually mean a shorter deck lifespan. Inserting stronger vibration-dampening elements will help, but that approach necessitates a more costly design procedure. As an alternative solution, mining engineers install specially designed ripple screens. This media type flexes and expands the apertures so that the pegging media can make its way forward. The independent flexing effect requires a series of wires and hooks, which repeatedly lengthen then dilate.

Augmented Pegging and Blinding Technology

So screening media can be as simple as a wire mesh panel or as complex as a specially shaped slab of polyurethane, complete with a wire array. Future technological developments are imminent. Independently vibrating wires, each frequency-tuned so that they hit 6000 strokes per minute, should put an end to flow blocking pegging incidents. High g-force amplitude modulation functions will take care of blinding problems with extreme prejudice. Again, these advancements are imminent. As well as a deck oscillation rate of 500 to 1000 strokes per minute, expect slippery polyurethanes, independent vibrating wires, and extreme g-force amplitude modulations, courtesy of an informed mining equipment supplier.

In all likelihood, blinding and pegging challenges won’t go away, at least not completely. As dedicated equipment manufacturers add more frequency-tuned features, however, those aperture blocking solids and films will break down before they can cause a flow-obstructing mess.